Thursday, August 4, 2016

a quilt top

First, wow!  I'm thoughtfully eating up your comments on "where have all the Blogs Gone?".  So much to consider.  They're so rich, I'm still reading them!  Thank you, thank you, thank you for being generous with your perspective and your encouragement.  Yes, of course, I plan to keep blogging!  In fact, your comments make it absolutely clear that blogging still has an important contribution to make to our quilting community.  Hurray for that!  Thanks to you I've added a few new blogs to my reader and feel a renewed energy to be a good reader as well.

But back to the making.

Twirly Top quilt top

I finished piecing my Twirly Top quilt, but... um... it ended up smaller than I planned.  Triangles are tricky like that.  They shrink more in width than they do in height, a lot more, as far as seam allowances.  In this picture the upper rows are already made into triangles each composed of three half hexagons.  Look at how much width I lose to seam allowances when I join the triangles to make a row (below).  My goodness!  And that's in addition to the seam allowances from joining the half hexagons as triangles.  Sheesh.

Twirly Top quilt top

To finish throw quilt size, I added a 5" border around.  The border is mainly Kona Cadet, a favorite of mine, plus some leftovers Cotton & Steel from the quilt top.  I used a range of solid blues to compliment my Porto & Beyond bundle, plus a dusty purple called Kona Plum (it's not as dark a plum as it appears in this picture).  To me the finished palette is peaceful and vaguely vintage-inspired.

Twirly Top quilt top

One of the fabrics from the Porto & Beyond bundle is a border print.  I saved the kitty cat border rather than letting it disappear in half hexagons.  Shows off perfectly down here in the border.

Twirly Top quilt top

My interrupted borders allow the solid Cadet to surround without stray seams.  I also like the modern, asymmetric appeal of interrupted borders.  Do you know I almost never buy fabric especially for borders or quilt backs?  I much prefer using what I have on hand and the extra bits of creativity that are born from necessity.  That kind of improvising is something I love about patchwork.  You can fix almost any mistake or fabric shortage by adjusting your approach.

Next, quilting and finishing.  Soon!

31 comments:

  1. It is lovely and we're SOOOOO glad you will continue to blog!!!!

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  2. I love the interrupted borders! Great idea. I'm going to have to remember that next time I need borders. :D The improvising part is one of my favorites, too. Do you have quilting ideas?

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  3. this turned out really great -- I have the accuquilt die that does half hexagons and this might be a neat way to put that to us. I made a triangles quilt for my niece and can totally sympathize with the shrinkage of the top, I thought I was never going to get that thing big enough.

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    1. Yep, you understand completely then! Since each triangle from my piece required cutting and choosing 3 half hexagons, I pretty quickly wimped out on making more and more. =)

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  4. I tried 3 times to Comment on the "What happened to the Blogs post" and my computer ate them or maybe it was the Prove you're not a Robot thing. I have added you to my Blogroll. I have been Blogging since 2008. It's my Journal of my Quilt life. Great finish. How will you quilt it?

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  5. The interrupted borders are great. I love the modern approach to the traditional drab (in my opinion} border. Do you have an secrets of speeding up the y-seam or do you have another method to avoid the pesky things all together?

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    1. Thanks! The way I do a y-seam requires only marking one piece with a dot at the 1/4" point, that is one piece per 3-half-hexagon set. I don't find that slows me down much! I don't even press the y-seam until it is complete, just using finger pressing as I go along. My method is pretty well documented in my Still Point pattern. I don't think it's a unique way of sewing a y-seam, but it is very well photographed and explained to help first timers =)

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  6. LOVE the "interrupted" borders!! That really gives your quilt a fun vintage vibe.

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  7. I love everything about this one - maybe because it is kind of vintage looking. I think it would fit in anywhere really well - very nice:))

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  8. Hello Rachel, I agree that blogs do provide inspiration and vibrancy to the quilting world. We should appreciate the bloggers by being more responsibl and committed subscribers. We can all contribute by engaging through offering comments and feedback. With reference to the article you linked to, I noted that there was no mention of the handpick get "slow stitching" movement and the subsequent impact on the industry.
    Thank you for your informative and inspirational blog. Very best wishes.

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  9. It's beautiful, Rachel! I especially love the border on the left that has only one interruption...something about that looks especially appealing to me. I'll have to remember that for the future.

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  10. I love this. So pretty, really fancy - kind of old timey, the fabrics, but very pleasing pattern.
    Love it

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  11. Oh my I love this quilt! The texture and colours! WOW!

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  12. Beautiful quilt, Rachel - the colors are wonderful and I love the interrupted borders! Definitely something to keep in mind the next time I run out of fabric...

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  13. I agree that this looks vintage! It comes together relatively easily - I'd love to try it some time. Right now I am still infatuated with HSTs and QSTs.
    I think triangles and diamonds are in my future though - thanks to your Angled class!!!

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    1. Oh, yes, I bet they are! Angles of all kind tend to excite my fancy.

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  14. I started blogging in 2007 and really enjoyed the camaraderie among online quilting friends. I went though a personal tragedy in 2011 when my beloved husband and biggest quilting fan passed away. I couldn't seem to keep much focus to be any kind of consistent with blogging for quite some time after that. Or quilting, either. Rebuilding a life takes a lot of time and energy. I'm back to reading my blog roll, and trying to be a better poster myself. I really enjoy the blogs and the quilting inspiration, as well as the pieces of life that are shared. There's something therapeutic about blogging for me.

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  15. That quilt is fun, I like the border especially the little cat. Greetings

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  16. This is super, Rachel! I love the fabrics and how you arranged the colours Looks good to have somewhere similar colours next to each other - that makes it look calm even it's busy. Your photos are once again so inpiring! x Teje

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  17. Lovely colours! I also like the interrupted borders, great idea. :)

    Sandy

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  18. Hi Rachel, I love how the twinkle top has come out. And I like the pieced border quite a lot. I think it gives the whole quilt a very nice additional twist. By the way I would like to tell you that your blog is one of my favorites and I have found so much inspiration for new quilts here. I learned to use fabric from my stash for pieced backs instead of hoarding it for some future projects and to save money this way. I have started a blog about my quilting adventures when I was rather new to the quilting world but I somehow lost the knack and stopped it Maybe I overdid it in the enthusiasm of the newbie . But reading your blog has motivated me to "reanimate" my blog and to share more of my quilting adventures.

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    1. Best wishes to you as you reanimate your blog =) I'm thrilled to hear you've benefited by adopting the pieced back approach. Feels so good to use things up!

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  19. Hi Rachel, I love how the twinkle top has come out. And I like the pieced border quite a lot. I think it gives the whole quilt a very nice additional twist. By the way I would like to tell you that your blog is one of my favorites and I have found so much inspiration for new quilts here. I learned to use fabric from my stash for pieced backs instead of hoarding it for some future projects and to save money this way. I have started a blog about my quilting adventures when I was rather new to the quilting world but I somehow lost the knack and stopped it Maybe I overdid it in the enthusiasm of the newbie . But reading your blog has motivated me to "reanimate" my blog and to share more of my quilting adventures.

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  20. the quilt top is awesome. the colors and textures just reach out. I love the border, especially the little kitty cat print. I will take this idea with me and also for scrappy borders. thanks you.

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  21. I'm always so impressed by the colors you put together in your quilts... I think I'd be interested in a color course if you ever do one again.

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  22. Its another beautiful finish and I'm so glad your post on blogs got us talking about the lack of blogging! I'm not stopping, and very happy you aren't either!

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  23. Love your finished Twirly Top! And yes the border makes it extra special (yeah for the cats!!!).

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  24. Your Twirly Top quilt looks great! In different colors, it would evoke swirling autumn leaves in a gust of wind... (Add one more quilt idea to the list of ten million things I want to make "someday"). So, curious about how your quilt didn't finish the size you intended. I take it you weren't using a pattern, then? Two ideas: Kay England's specialty rulers for Nifty Notions make it easy to calculate and cut the various size triangles from strips. It's hard to explain but not hard to do. Whatever size you want your triangle to finish, you cut your strip 1/2" wider and then the triangle ruler notches off that point for you so that your triangle comes out the right size after piecing it. You can buy the rulers individually as you need them, or go whole hog and get the entire set at once like I did, at a seminar with Kay. My other secret weapon is EQ7, which does all the math for you in whatever quilt you design and then tells you what size to rotary cut, or prints templates or foundation patterns, whichever you select. I agree with your Happy Accident theory, though -- the borders look great, so if you only added them because the quilt finished too small, then it was really a good thing in the end!

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    1. Thanks for those tips, Rebecca. I've never tried EQ, but I'd like to. For many of my quilts I like to just start cutting and sewing and then cut/sew some more until things are the right size. I often prefer that approach to finding out in advance how many total of X I need to cut. That number can feel overwhelming! But, sometimes, it would be nice to have things planned out by a software.

      Also, great point about an autumn quilt!

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