Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Nicey Jane

Look how Easter is sneaking up on us in March!  Are you making anything for your celebrations?

Nicey Jane for Easter

My girlie and I settled on a fabric for her Easter dress just in the nick of time.  She's 11 now, and as much as she still craves handmade dresses, she has very clear ideas on colors and fabrics.  Everything she was drawn to had a black or midnight blue background with bright, bold colors.  For Easter?  For spring?  I couldn't do it!  We compromised on something not pink (per Aria) and not dark (per mom).  Yes, it's Nicey Jane to the rescue!  The reprint of these popular vintage-inspired florals is in stock at Lark Cottons.  What could be more fitting for blooming spring days?

Nicey Jane for Easter

I am remaking a dress I cobbled together about two years ago, altering the Geranium dress bodice to have a higher neckline, longer (non empire) bodice and fuller skirt.  This time we're working from a size 10.  As per usual, I cannot restrain myself to just one fabric in the makings of a dress.  The patchworker in me wins out! 

This time I've joined my contrast fabric to the main fabric with a finished seam that I find I like even more than a French seam.  You sew a normal 1/2" seam, press it open, then press the seam allowances under so that the raw edges are tucked inside a 1/4" doublefold on either side of the seam.  Last, you finish with a scant 1/4" topstitch on each side of the pressed open seam, sewn from the right side.  This sews down the double folded seam allowances, creating a flat, secure join with no raw edges.  This seam is much flatter than a French.  According to my apparel sewing book, it's just called a "self finished seam".  Maybe if it had a sexier name it would be more in vogue (wink).

Nicey Jane for Easter

Construction notes:  Cut (2) 16" WOF for skirt main and (2) 10" WOF for skirt contrast.  Cut (1) 6.5" WOF for bodice contrast.  Add 2.5" to bodice length at waist.  Don't forget to cut the bodice lining pieces with 2.5" longer waist length too.

Well, I best get back to Nicey Jane.  Wishing you a nicey kind of day!

8 comments:

  1. I was wondering how to make French seams flatter-- this is the answer! Thank you for sharing. It warms my heart that Aria still wants handmade dresses at 11- so sweet and I'm hopeful mine will last that long.

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  2. Such pretty fabric. It screams Spring. :D

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  3. Lovely fabrics--look great together. I always look forward to seeing what you make for your children.

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  4. I love the fabric, I am sure the dress will be very pretty.
    I really enjoyed making dresses for Easter for my girls.
    I am not making any thing this year. Maybe a cute basket for Sarah to throw around :-P
    Happy Easter to all of you. It is early this year, so we are still scrambling on after church plans for a gathering.

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  5. Very cute fabrics Rachel and I love the way you use more than one in the dress. My daughter had her own determined tastes from an early age too, but still liked handmade things.

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  6. Ooh! Love that seam! I think I may use that for the Easter dress that I am still determined to get done for my daughter despite the fact that it's Wednesday night and all I've done is pick out the fabric and cut out the bodice pattern pieces. Sigh.

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  7. please show this when you finish. I have just sewn my first two geranium dresses for my first and only granddaughter and I love the pattern. I would like to see how your version works out.

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