Wednesday, December 2, 2015

Tipsy {Improv Handbook Score #2}

Tipsy {Improv Handbook Score #2}

Tipsy {Improv Handbook Score 
#2} 

All finished!  This is Tipsy, an improv quilt made entirely without rulers (except for the backing and binding) and inspired by the second score of The Improv Handbook for Modern Quilters.  Sherri prompts us to reflect and share about our finished works along these lines:

{Surprises} My intention was to work in a moody palette with dusky purples, lots of somber grays, dull browns and sharp black.  But I let in more sunshine that I expected!  The yellow really stands out among all those urban tones.  I am definitely happy with the finished color mix, but the upbeat finish took me by surprise.  Maybe the lesson here is that a little bit of joy can go a long way...

{Discoveries}  Working with pieced "fabric" (i.e. cutting shapes from string sheets) makes for a quilt that looks quite complex for the amount of time it required.  Also, the stripes bring a directionality to everything you cut, creating the opportunity for so much movement.  Since I'm drawn to layers of interest and movement in quilt design, I can see myself using this string sheet score again.

Tipsy {Improv Handbook Score #2}

{Satisfactions} I'm pleased that I took on the challenge of working with triangles, despite the ruler-free paradigm.  It was very satisfying to use my angled sewing skills to playfully preserve points.  If this is a skill you'd like to hone, I'm glad to say I'll be encoring my Angled online sewing course early in the new year.  Hope you'll join us!

I'm also pleased that this quilt feels entirely mine, without any hints of doubt as with Score #1.  The subtitle of Score #2 is "Doing It My Way."   Glad my work fit the bill!

Tipsy {Improv Handbook Score #2}

{Dissatisfactions} I'd like to see a little more negative space above the black/white small triangles row and a little less negative space between the large and smaller tipsy diamonds.  I was so eager to sew it all together and see what I had created that I probably went too quickly during the row-joining stage.

{Next Steps} The next score in the book is a round robin.  I love the overarching concept of that exercise, which is that improv is a "yes, and" conversation.  That's something I practice when I rarely (if ever) edit out any piece I cut or sew during improv, preferring to challenge myself to make it all work.  For the Tipsy quilt I even used up all my scraps on the quilt back!

Tipsy {Improv Handbook Score #2}

However, I don't feel up to organizing a round robin at the moment.  Instead, I'm going to move on to Score #4, which is about "Letting Go of Expectation."  Can you see why I'm working through this book?  Improv is quilting therapy.

Join in if you need some!

p.s.  Tipsy is listed on Etsy now.  She hopes to make someone happy this holiday.



28 comments:

  1. It's so nice! "A little joy goes a long way..." I love that thought. :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. First - LOVE this one, Rachel! Second - thank you for sharing your process with these. I am also working through this book although I am still finishing the first one :) And I concur that improv piecing is not only therapeutic, it is wonderfully cathartic. I'll be sharing my finished quilt on my blog probably next week....it became a process of working through grief and also discovering "me" in this new world of loss. I'm looking forward to continuing the journey!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's wonderful, Wendy! I hope you'll add a link to your finished quilt when you post it. Would love to see it!

      Delete
  3. I really enjoy your reflection about this quilt. You are stretching yourself in neat ways and I admire that.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I started with the improv round robin score. It wouldn't be quite the same experience, but you could potentially do a start and then do a round on it between each of the other scores.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. HHmmmm... that's an smart idea. I'll think about that =)

      Delete
  5. Another thought provoking post - I hope you're doing ok Rachel:))

    ReplyDelete
  6. This came out great! I think your thought that a little joy goes a long way is very reflective of some things you said in your last post. Quilting can offer life lessons, too. For anyone reading this that has thought about taking Rachel's wonderful Angled Class ... don't think about it ... do it! It's a terrific class and offers so much. I'm glad you are offering it again, Rachel.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I Love this quilt!!!! It's gorgeous! Well done!

    ReplyDelete
  8. This is beautiful! The palette is works so well with the angles.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! I agree that the high contrast seems to emphasize the angles. Good point (wink).

      Delete
  9. Rachel, this is really cool. I love the colors, very dramatic and moving!!
    I love the layout. I love those gold streaks
    I think I am too timid- ....uh no I am not timid, My family, daughters, hubbs, every one I know
    goes nuts when I go "off the path". My older son in law is encouraging, but he is a busy guy.
    I am sure this beauty will sell quickly.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey, no fair to have people reigning you in. My husband is totally a naysayer about my work and even my clothes. I've had to learn to tune him out. Hey, maybe that's why I went to blogging - to get some yaysayers in my corner! ha.

      Delete
  10. Quite a visual impact! the yellows are present but not overpowering. And the upper distributed teal is effective too --to me it is the accent. FWIW, I like the wider space in the middle as is; gives the top row of "diamonds" a look that they are hanging from hooks. claire aka knitnkwilt.wordpress.com

    ReplyDelete
  11. Absolutely beautiful! I loved your initial color selections, but with the additions you made as you went along, the finished piece is even more lovely. And what a beautiful observation about a little joy going a long way! Praying for peace and grace for you as you love and care for your dear little one and the rest of your family.

    (Oh - also I love the playful back! How cool that you were able to use up your scraps too!)

    ReplyDelete
  12. I love Tipsy. Glad you enjoyed the process. I am looking forward to trying some of the scores.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I love Tipsy. Glad you enjoyed the process. I am looking forward to trying some of the scores.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Love the color combo--very nice quilt!!

    ReplyDelete
  15. It is wonderful and the bit of sunshine breaking through does change everything.
    I love love love the back!

    I thought about doing a family round robin, letting each of my kiddos layout a section. Or skipping it like you are. Oh course, I need to finish #2 first ;)

    ReplyDelete
  16. Can I just say....didn't even read, just love,what you have done! Gorgeous work....thank you. X

    ReplyDelete
  17. This is such a striking quilt Rachel and it turned out beautifully! Do you think, perhaps, it is a mirror of your emotional state during the time you made it? I am only just starting to learn how to improv quilt. It seems to be a much more emotional experience to me - that you pour more of your self into the quilt, than with other types of quilting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Absolutely! Improv quilts do mirror one's emotions, or at least they want to. I set out to use a moody palette because I wanted to feel very connected to the work. And I did feel connected all the way through. I'm looking forward to starting Score #4 soon. Hope you're enjoying your improv!

      Delete
  18. Such a wonderful post on your process! The quilt is beautiful and reflect your insights and discoveries. When you are working on this level - of being completely engaged with your choices and process it is reflected in the outcome. The quilt caries your presence! Well done looking forward to score #4! BTW - the doodle quilt score is the Improv Round Robin done solo. It's a yes and conversation with yourself and the patchwork as it unfolds.

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts with Thumbnails