Wednesday, September 30, 2015

How would you quilt this?

Maybe you can help me out?   The quilt top that's been hanging around the longest in my sewing room is a very special quilt. 

Tangential, a cumulative queen-sized quilt

Tangential queen-sized quilt for Angled

Tangential is a queen-sized work created for Angled class, an online course I offered in 2014.  I'm rather fond of how it turned out, so I feel a bit intimidated about choosing a quilt pattern, let alone actually doing the quilting.  I think the solution is to have it long arm quilted!  Last night I started looking at edge-to-edge quilting patterns, but I just couldn't imagine any of them being a good fit.  I think it's the irregular block pattern that confuses me.  Maybe I'm being too cautious?  So, help me out.  How would you have this one quilted?  Ideally, an edge-to-edge design would be more affordable, but if you have some specific custom quilting ideas to share, please do.

Thanks for your advice!

46 comments:

  1. Hi Rachel. I recommend you check out Kathleen Riggins' work on kathleenquilts.com. She's an up and coming young quilter who's doing some amazing work right now. She even does a once-a-week feature where she gives advice on how she's approach a quilt. Might be worth seeing what she says. If you can afford to, get her to do it for you... you'd be amazed I think.

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  2. Wow, this quilt is awesome! Now you've got me thinking... so I did a really quick quilting mock-up... https://www.flickr.com/gp/meganannephoto/02KxE2 (just used yellow to have the lines show up) Was thinking something like this would give the quilt movement and tie the top part into the bottom part without taking away for the differentiation of the two.

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  3. WOW, no wonder you're wanting to get this one just right, it's absolutely beautiful. I don't know much about long arm quilting, I'm a hand quilter, but in my opinion, I think it really needs something specialized to highlight the criss cross and individual stars and top part, even though it would be more expensive than edge to edge quilting. I think that it would be worth it in the end. It would also probably be worth it to write to long arm quilters and ask them how they would approach your quilt. You'd probably get a lot of ideas, and maybe find the quilter for you. sarah@forrussia.org

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  4. You've probably already seen it, but have you looked at the Kaleidoscope Patchwork Quilt by Urban Outfitters (it's sold out now but can still be seen on Pinterest & the web)? They keep things pretty simple but I think it looks really nice.

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  5. I wish I had the vision and imagination to come up with a suggestion! Your quilt top is simply so stunning that I had to say so.

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  6. lol, If I was quilting it, I would just do straight line quilting and outline everything. :) But that is me, lol. I only do straightline quilting on my little Janome.

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  7. Hi Rachel...Just wanted to tell you that I think your quilt is beautiful, but I have no idea what to suggest. I'm sure you will find the perfect solution to your dilemma while searching online. Someone is sure to come up with the perfect way to quilt this gorgeous creation. Hope all is going well with your bundle from Heaven and that she will continue to improve as much as she possibly can, albeit at a somewhat slower pace than you would wish for her. You are a beautiful person, inside and out and she couldn't have picked a more perfect mom. lv2bquilting2@comcast.net

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  8. My go-to is straightline, because it never seems to distract from the top. I'm sure whatever you choose, it'll be beautiful!

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  9. Maybe you can take some inspiration from Ali (SewKiwi) and then make it your own! I really loved how her Tangential was quilted :-) https://www.flickr.com/photos/54866938@N06/15882190486/in/dateposted/

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  10. It is a really beautiful and classy quilt. No suggestions - quilting is always the hardest part for me. I'd be tempted to hand quilt it but then I'm a crap machine quilter.

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  11. Your quilt is absolutely beautiful! Sorry I have no suggestions for the machine quilting, maybe hand quilting.

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  12. I would quilt a huge spiral in each quadrant and detailed quilting (not sure what though) in the geese. The quadrants are what stick out for me in terms of movement.

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  13. I agree with Pauline (#1). I follow kathleenquilts.com too -- tell her we think she should feature you on the next 'how I'd quilt it' post!!!

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  14. Your quilt top is amazing! I checked kathleenquilts too, and she does amazing quilting! If that top was my beautiful creation, I might ask Kathleen to quilt it. Thanks for sharing your work.

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  15. My 17 yo, aspiring engineer, son pulled out his straight edge and held it to the screen and then suggested to quilt on the diagonal - he said that they should follow across the quilt fairly nicely. lol

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    1. hmm... he's right. It looks like a diagonal would align with most of the seams. That's a simple possibility that I could even do at home.

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  16. I can appreciate your trepidation. I have a pineapple quilt that intimidates the heck out of me.
    Whatever you do, it will be great.

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  17. I would agree with other commenters... send a picture of your quilt to kathleenquilts and she may select if for her Friday quilt segment where she suggests quilting designs by drawing on your pic and posting it to her blog ...check it out.

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  18. It's a stunning quilt top! I can see why you want to get this one done by a long armer. I think you should go with something that highlights the geometric beauty of the blocks as well as those paths of flying geese. I'm going to go check out the work that others have suggested here because I am also a fairly new long armer and always want to learn and see the eye candy! I don't think you should go with an edge to edge pattern because you would probably be dissatisfied with it each time you saw it. I know that individual quilting costs more but perhaps you can work out a deal with someone to swap some good coverage for them to get a discount. You have a lot of followers and that kind of exposure can be great for a quilter. Hope that helps!

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  19. What about on-point squares - the smallest one starting in the middle of the center blue square and the others outlines of that square, larger and larger moving outward (concentric on-point squares)? So further out it would look like diagonal quilting, but going toward all the directions the geese are "pointing" to.

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    1. Ooooh, I like that! Sounds hard to execute, but pretty.

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  20. I'm in the same boat! I finished my tangential almost a year ago and it's folded up on my shelf waiting to be quilted. I'll probably end up doing a bunch of straight lines because thats what I always end up doing. Ha!

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  21. When I want an affordable all-over quilting pattern done by a longarm quilter, I always love the baptist fan.

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  22. For me the quilt requires mostly lineair quilting. I would ditch the on-point center squares maybe even twice, since there's no room for outlining them otherwise. I would simply echo repeatedly the outside of the segments of the stars and maybe give a little swirly touch to the inside of the segments of the solid stars to mirror the motifs of the print stars.The HST unities are the hardest part for me and the quilting there depends also on the stitch tolerance of your batting. I would simply the quilting to some diagonal straight lines in de HST blocks to echo the center star block.
    For the geese a continuous line of little triangles in the white part of the geese, echoing the black triangles. In the first border a vertical up and down filler and in the 2nd border a motif of triangle shapes, one row their top to the outside of the quilt crossed by a row pointing to the inside of the quilt ( so the two tops opposite to one another).

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  23. I'm going a little different and going to suggest circles or gentle curves. I love what Jacquie does, and something like this might make your quilt sing: http://tallgrassprairiestudio.blogspot.com/2014/12/moving-on.html
    Even concentric circles might be cool, overlapping to create radiating movement.
    Good luck deciding, its a beautiful top.

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  24. Such a beautiful quilt! I remember admiring it and wishing I had the time and money for your classes! 😄 Good luck choosing a quilting design! I'm sure it will be awesome!

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  25. I was so surprised to see how big that quilt is! Thought it was a wallhanging! No help on the quilting. I have many un quilted tops as I am not a fan of all over designs. I am waiting for the quilts to " talk" to me I guess.

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  26. Awesome quilt top! I'd definitely send it out to be quilted with an all over design.

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  27. That is such a beautiful quilt. I don't blame you for wanting a perfect finish. I would also suggest you look into one of our local longarm quilters, Maria O'Haver. http://www.mariaohaver.com/home.html
    She does a lot of quilts in this area and her work is beautiful. I think she would be able to make good suggestions for you. She also makes her own gorgeous quilts in addition to beautiful longarm work.

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  28. This is not a suggestion but just want to point this page out to you if you haven't seen it yet. I like the Modern Serpentine and the Modern Curves. Good luck!

    http://www.anitashackelford.com/modern-set-1.html

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  29. This is incredible! I just love it on your bed! When I'm that scared, I hand quilt. I have so much more control and time to think. Probably not where you're at right now (though I'd totally do it for you!)
    I recently got a 'square dance' or 'squared' I can't remember the name, on my Mountain Campfire quilt, which had similar angles, and I was really happy with it. It wasn't curly and I like that it ran straight up and down in contrast to the diagonals in the quilt. It was more like a loose maze. It felt like something I would do but way straighter and neater! Good luck! x

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  30. I would look at using soft waves. The quilt is quite angular and soft curves would give it flow and motion and soften its edges.

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  31. What a spectacular quilt. I agree with comment 32. An edge to edge with some curves will give texture but let the quilt be front and center. If you want to show the quilt then custom quilting will make it a prize winner. Whatever you decide will make it special.

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  32. I don't think you're being too picky, but I do think that whatever you ultimately decide will be wonderful. There are lots of wonderful ideas here. And while I'm not an expert, I might go along with the idea of doing the graceful curvesl

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  33. I say, don't overdo it. Let the pieced quilt be the star.

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  34. Amazing and beautiful. Love the colors.
    I really like all of the ideas here too
    I got this update yesterday but decided to wait it out to see what every one has to say.
    It looks just wonderful on your bed!

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  35. I'm with many others in thinking that curves will offset this lovely quilt. Is the spiral a trend on its way out? I don't know -- I still love it. A spiral starting in the center. Four spirals, one each centered on one of the four motifs, and overlapping like ripples in a pond where they meet. Four large-scale Baptist fans, one each as above. It's a beautiful quilt top.

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  36. Custom quilting would be lost on this complex design. Google until you find a geometric pantograph design, or talk to your long armed about what geometric designs she has. You could even buy a new design for her; they are usually under $20. Good luck!

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  37. I believe this would be best with a quilting design that mimics the flow of the shapes. Something like Angela Waters work, where you would echo the triangle starbursts by denser-quilt/outline the triangles, in the white, so that the triangles themselves pop out. There'd be a lot of lovely, simple, dot-to-dot options for the navy-white part of the four main blocks, but basically, I'd be looking to do those as a repetitive, semi-dense shape as well, with outline-inline in the star shapes themselves. For the borders, I'd bring it all together with dot-to-dot arcs. If any of this appeals, I could print out the quilt pic, ink on the ideas, and upload it.

    I think you could absolutely 100% FMQ this yourself. In fact, based on your own tutorials, I think you'd enjoy it. I might send you to the Angela Waters dot-to-dot craftsy class or the one from my other fav teacher (blanking on her name, but great work) as a refresher/intro, but lady, you could really do this. No problem.

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  38. My eye is drawn to the center circle created by the inside sides of the onpoint squares - love the black center. Perhaps concentric circles from center but interupt them with straightlines through the geese that would form a cross thru center. That would allow center aquare to be tiny little boxes.

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  39. If you go with sending it to a longarm quilter, I highly recommend Kathy at Stitch by Stitch. She does amazing work & has very reasonable prices.

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  40. Gorgeous Top! I think you should quilt it yourself.
    My suggestions are as follows:
    outline the stars on the beige in black. Make a 1/4 outline in black (just around the star) then quilt a swirly pattern using black thread to the triangle border...continuing the same swirly pattern in the black HSTs (only those bordering the beige.) In the remaining black HSTs stitch in a ditch around each black HST then make a single arc from long corner to long corner.
    In the center black square stitch in a ditch around the block. quilt 1/4" border inside the block on all four sides. Repeat the same swirly pattern in the center.
    Then outline the large blocks (the white part) using stitch in a ditch. Quilt a 1/4" border (in the white part) using white thread. Quilt the cross and outside white border with either the same swirly pattern or a different swirly pattern.
    Leave the green HSTs alone.
    Optionally do a matching arc in the white HSTs using white thread.
    Using a coordinating blue thread outline the blue edges entirely. I think skip the 1/4" border in this area and quilt a pattern of whatever flavor your like.
    I think the pattern inside the 4 colored stars and the yellow half stars should be similar to all other stars...and the quilting should NOT be dense. More of a flowing pattern to make the shape feel cohesive.
    Also optional...outline the orange with 1/4" and repeat the swirly pattern using an orange thread....if you go that way I would repeat the black swirly pattern and 1/4" pattern from the center square and around the colored stars.

    It is a lovely quilt. A more conservative way to go (also do at home) is to stitch in a ditch around each color.

    Good luck and I look forward to seeing the completed version!

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  41. It's a lovely quilt. I would also look at Red Pepper Quilts Blog from Jan 6, 2015
    http://www.redpepperquilts.com/search?updated-max=2015-01-18T11:41:00%2B11:00&max-results=8
    It's a similar quilt and has some great elements.
    Hope this helps.
    LauraT

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