Friday, January 9, 2015

Sun Squares crochet + pattern

We've been enduring a coooooold snap here in South Carolina, so most evenings I want nothing more than to cozy up on the sofa with some soft yarn to spin up sun squares crochet.  Yep, I've been making steady progress on my resurrected crochet project!

Sun Squares crochet progress

Today I decided to find a way to get these pretties on my wall.  It's a crochet design wall!  Courtesy of masking tape.

Sun Squares crochet progress

Sun Squares crochet progress

Ok, so maybe it was an excessive use of masking tape, but now I can really see how much I've done and which color combos I'd like to repeat.  

Sun Squares crochet progress

It totally was not an excuse to spend my morning in the warmest room in the house.  I would never do that.

What do you think?  Looks like about half a blanket to me!

Sun Squares crochet progress

By the way, I wanted to link you to the crochet tutorial I began following years ago when I started this project, but the site has been taken down.  Sad face.  It was the "circle-in-a-square granny pattern" by 1/4 of an Inch.  I have changed the pattern just a tad, so I'll record it here in crochet-speak for those who are familiar with American-style crochet patterns.  Change color after each round.

{Sun Square Crochet Pattern}

Foundation Ring:  Chain 4, join with slip stitch to form ring.

Round 1:  Chain 3 (counts as 1 triple), 11 triple into the ring, join with slip stitch into 3rd of starting chain.  Round one appears as 12 triple crochet all into the center of the ring.

Round 2: Join yarn into space between any triple crochet.
  • Starting shape:  Chain 2, yarn over and insert hook in same space between triple crochet, yarn over, draw the yarn through space (3 loops on hook), yarn over and draw through 2 loops (2 loops on hook), yarn over and draw through 2 loops, leaving one on the hook (counts as 1 bobble). Chain 1.
  • Bobble:  Yarn over and insert hook in next space between triple crochet, yarn over, draw the yarn through space (3 loops on hook), yarn over and draw through 2 loops (2 loops on hook), yarn over and insert hook in same space between triple crochet, yarn over, draw the yarn through space (4 loops on hook), yarn over and draw through 2 loops (3 loops on hook), yarn over and draw through all 3 loops, leaving one on the hook.  Chain 1.
  • Repeat all thew way around, making 11 Bobbles total.  Join with slip stitch into 2nd of starting chain.  Round two appears as 12 bobble stitches in the space between each triple crochet. 
Round 3:  Join yarn into space between any bobbles.
  • Starting shape:  Chain 3, 2 triple crochet (counts as 1 triple cluster). Chain 1.
  • Triple Cluster:  3 triple crochet in next space between bobbles.  Chain 1.
  • Repeat all the way around, making 11 triple clusters total.  Join with slip stitch into 3rd of starting chain.  Round three appears as 12 triple clusters in the space between each bobble.
Round 4:  Join yarn into space between any triple cluster.
  • Starting shape:  Chain 2, 2 double crochet (counts as 1 double cluster). Chain 1.
  • Double Cluster:  3 double crochet in next space between triple clusters.  Chain 1.
  • Corner Cluster:  3 triple crochet, chain 3, 3 triple crochet in next space between triple clusters.  Chain 1.
  • Continue around, alternating 2 double clusters with 1 corner cluster.  Join with slip stitch into 2nd of starting chain.  Round four transforms the circle into a square with 4 evenly spaced corner clusters, each separated by 2 double clusters.  Fasten off.
Happy hooking!

p.s. I'm working in Cascade 220 yarn, which you can find at The Loopy Ewe in 243 delectable shades!


25 comments:

  1. It looks so pretty! I'd have a hard time not to see and look at it all day!

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  2. Thanks for the instructions Rachel! Its beautiful! By the way, what hook size are you using? How I miss my cold SC days!

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  3. This just makes me want to learn to crochet!

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    1. Crochet is hard at the beginning but it really gets easy!

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  4. Your project reminds me of one I started awhile ago and put away half finished. I was using this pattern -->http://posie-rosy-little-things.myshopify.com/collections/crochet-patterns/products/sunshine-day-afghan-crochet-pattern with Knit Picks Capra (cashmere!) for the centers and Cascade Eco for the outside. It was coming out so beautiful, but those endless puff stitches! I think you may have inspired me to drag it out and finish it, especially as I am newly determined to finish all WIPs!

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    1. Yes, they are very similar patterns! Oh, your project sounds like texture heaven. Hope you do get it back out!

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  5. I just sent you a pictorial tutorial on joining crochet squares. I have seen several ways to do it, but this was new to me and looks fabulous if you don't want to see the join.

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  6. This is very pretty and makes me rather nostalgic as my mother used to make those. I know how to crochet but could never stand doing it. My stitches tend to get tighter and tighter as I go along. :( I did learn to knit (a little) and find it interesting that the tight stitch syndrome doesn't seem to affect my knitting. Weird, huh?
    It is totally freezing here and if I had a fireplace that's where I'd be, too. No apologies for it, either. LOL. Keep warm.

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    1. I've been letting Aria work on my sun squares when she feels the urge. She's pretty good at crochet. We have different tensions though, so some of the squares are ending up... well less squarish than could be desired. LOL! I figure they will all pull together just fine though since crochet joining is SO much more forgiving than quilt block joining. Stay warm!

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  7. And there is yet ANOTHER project added to my "To Do' list! HAHA I tried to convince the hubs that I NEEDED that yarn so that I can make it as pretty as yours is. But then I was reminded that I had a huge yarn stash and that I can't buy any more until that is gone. :( Challenge accepted! ;)
    Thanks for being such an enabler Rachel! :D lol

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    1. It's been said that granny square-ish projects like this are awesome for yarn scraps!

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  8. It's so pretty and cheerful! I don't know how to crochet, but this sure is inspiring me to learn! Thanks, Rachel!

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  9. I love your "design wall!" I'm very envious of those lovely bricks and a real fireplace. :) It is impressive how you have combined all those colors which look like they couldn't possibly go together and when they are all lined up like that, it looks so harmonious. Pretty awesome! And that is going to be such a comfy blanket in Cascade 220. I don't crochet but I've knitted sweaters out of it that are super warm.

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  10. My husband asked me the other day, "why don't you knit." With that little push I've added learning to knit and/or crochet to my 2015 list. Which do you think I should start with? :)

    Rachel your squares remind me of this http://www.pinterest.com/pin/248401735673434165/ which I love. They are going to make a perfect snuggle blanket.

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    1. Oh, that blanket you linked to is lovely! Yes, that is definitely what I'm going for. It takes longer than I would have thought, but I really am enjoying the process. Wouldn't even mind if I don't finish it this year, which is rather strange for me.

      Hmm.. that's hard to say whether I recommend starting with knit or crochet. In my opinion, knitting is much more useful - lots of great patterns out there, makes nicer finished products with more variety. Crochet tends to work up faster, but it makes thicker/bulkier works with larger holes (intentional holes from the crochet style) than knitting, generally. Many people find that if they learn one they have trouble learning the other. I guess I think the ideal may be to start with knitting, but learn the Continental way, which involves "pulling" the yarn rather than "throwing" it. The Continental style of knitting translates easier to crochet, making it easier to eventually learn both than if you learn the American/UK style of "throwing" yarn. I started with crochet, which I now heavily favor. It's easier to hide mistakes or fix a problem with crochet. Knit is prettier, slower and more technical, in my opinion. Hope that helps!

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  11. Oooh, so pretty! And thank you for the pattern! I'm currently working on a puff stitch based granny motif afghan, but I am pinning this for future reference! I am loving learning to crochet! It's all I want to do!!! OBSESSSION. LOL, it's a good thing I'm not quite as insane in my "real life" as in my crafting life, because I am pretty darn insane.

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  12. Gorgeous! And so funny because I was JUST telling my mom I'd like to do a patchwork-looking crochet blanket!

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  13. I love that quilt and helping you make it AND winding balls Every signal square is so perfect in color and stitch!

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  14. I have always wanted to make one of these blankets ever since they became popular on blogland a few years ago. You've inspired me to finally make one (with the help of my mom!). I'm shopping for cascade yarn and was curious how many colors and skeins of each color you are using/recommend for this blanket. Thanks in advance!

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    1. Oh, good question! I am using 2 pinks, red, 5 blues, 2 grays, 2 yellows, green, 2 oranges, 2 purples and one carmel brown. All the above are different colors. I am using cream as my background color and think I might end up using about 7-8 skeins of it before I'm done.

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  15. this looks beautiful! how do you chose the colors? randomly? or do you follow a kind of system while crocheting? i would find it hard to keep a kind of overview...

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    1. Thanks! I choose my colors as I go. Sometimes i repeat a favorite square, but more often I keep experimenting depending on my mood.

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