Thursday, August 28, 2014

in the bag

an Up Parasol sleeping bag

This one is all wrapped up!

an Up Parasol sleeping bag

I ended up getting too bored to do a straight, simple strip patchwork top.  So after starting out that way, I cut up my strips and pieced them together willy nilly, with the goal of keeping same fabrics kind of spread out.  Love how the addition of Kona Lime added some much-needed contrast and a place for the eye to rest.

an Up Parasol sleeping bag

Inside I used mostly Trellis in pink, a nice basic from this collection.  Other than the Kona Lime, all fabrics are Up Parasol by Heather Bailey, which you can find in stock at Fat Quarter Shop, Dragonfly Fabrics, Fabricworm and in Canada at Mad About Patchwork and Fabric Spot.

an Up Parasol sleeping bag

We have a camping trip coming up in just a few weeks...  Perfect!

Pondering the wherefores and whys of handmade sleeping bags?  I was inspired to make these a few years ago after a particularly warm summer camping trip.  It was too warm for the kids to get inside their store bought, synthetic sleeping bags, so they were writhing on top, their skin sticking and sweating on the slick polyester surfaces.  Ew.

Light bulb moment -  synthetic polyester sleeping bags have several disadvantages:
  1. Easily too warm and sweat-inducing
  2. Uncomfortable to lay upon
  3. Made of oil-based materials
  4. Noisy (as in, you can here everyone in the tent toss and turn)
an Up Parasol sleeping bag

Since I made Liam's sleeping bag two years ago, it has seen lots of use.  It's plenty warm for our spring through autumn camping trips and for sleepovers at a friend's house.   Quilted sleeping bags are also more compact than fluffy polyester fill, folding easily rather than slipping away as a child attempts to carry them to the car.  They wash, dry, fold and stack like a quilt.  Win-win.  The only qualifier is that they are not as warm as most manufactured sleeping bags.  If you're going to be outside on a cold night, best take something suited for cold extremes.

Anyhoo, we like our quilted sleeping bags.  If you'd like to make one, I shared a tutorial here

an Up Parasol sleeping bag

p.s. Does this remind you of anyone?  Haha... I captured this shot the day before our little sleeping bag photoshoot.  Love that girl!


14 comments:

  1. Yay! It's beautiful! One this goes to my list. But I'm starting with Angled first. :)

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  2. adorable sleeping bag. And that last shot- priceless :)

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  3. This is so so beautiful! and that last pick!! love it!

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  4. I like how you decided to cut the strips and sew them together willy nilly. I am so tempted to try my hand at one of these -- will pin it and hope I get my nerve up :-) .

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    1. Good luck, Cheryl! It's not hard, just different =)

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  5. Hi Rachel: Great sleeping bag. I was thinking if you did want to make it a bit warmer you could put a flannel on the inside.

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  6. Gorgeous, and the picture of her relaxing in it is sweet. Unfortunately, where I live, we need those polyester sleeping bags even in the summer most of the time.

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  7. Is that your cat with a quilt at the end there? So cute! I love the quilted sleeping bags too. Will have to think if we can use them here. Camping is all done in the mountains here so it gets pretty cold even in the summer.

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    1. Yes, that's Aria's cat, Susan. She has trained her to sleep in a little wooden bed that she made, and apparently under that quilt Aria made as well. Ha!

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  8. Great idea! I'm thinking this might be a good gift idea for my two nieces aged 10 and almost 13. Maybe for Christmas. They don't camp, but I bet they'd be great for sleepovers, too. :)

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  9. Thank you so much for sharing the sleeping bag. I want to make one also. I always enjoy your postings very much.

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  10. Adorable- and so much softer than a traditional sleeping bag!!!

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