Wednesday, February 1, 2012

Sashiko Coasters

Hey y'all!  Can I just say, I've had a lovely day!  I feel so good because Curves Class has officially started and look...I survived!  I mean, here I am making my post for tomorrow, tonight.  Yay!  And earlier I was piecing my flying geese into rows.  (Now that's a project that majorly stalled due to all this other action.)  Liam's going to have curtains again someday!  What a good mom I am (wink, wink).

Sashiko coasters for Stitch Magazine

Ok, so I have another bitty project to share with you today.  It's another bunch of handwork I did for Stitch Magazine's Spring 2012 issue, but this time.... with Sashiko embroidery!  Ok, that's not much of a surprise given the title of this post, but are you impressed?  Are ya?  Are ya?

a fun little canvas for stitches!

Not that Sashiko's hard.  It's not.  It's totally fun!  You can learn all about how to do it online at Studio Aika.  I know that lots of us are interested in Sashiko, but maybe you weren't too keen on taking on a big new project in a style you hadn't tried before.  And then there's the fact that traditional Sashiko uses special needles and thread.

with Anna Maria Horner's threads!

Sashiko embroidery

Well, I didn't!  I used pearl cotton from Anna Maria Horner's lovely boxed set and my trusty Chenille 24 needles (LOVE those).  I'm not saying these materials are better than traditional materials for Sashiko, I'm just saying you might be able to use something on hand!

 Wintery hues

Anyhoo, I used Saral Transfer Paper to transfer traditional Sashiko designs onto Essex Linen. The Essex Linen from Robert Kaufman is a cotton/linen blend with some linen-y texture but none of the shifty-naughtiness.  Although you often see it used in neutrals, Essex actually comes in lots of pretty colors.  I worked with Sand, Putty, Light Blue and Medium Aqua.   These colors and this one coin purse feel so beautifully wintery to me right now.  I could never actually have one of the white houses with white furniture and light carpets and a luxurious calm, soothing vibe (for SO many reasons), but right at this moment I think I would enjoy making a quilt that feels like that.  A very wintery quilt indeed.

Well there I am rambling!  I'm going to jump off there and snag a brownie before watching some Finder with my husband.   I know I've been ridiculously chipper tonight.  Thanks for taking it like a good friend.  And, hey, I don't even hear you laughing!  Isn't blogland a perfectly delightful place!

P.S.  Uncle Sam wants me to tell you that sometimes my links for products on Amazon (like the needles and transfer paper) are linked to me so that if you buy something I get a little Amazon store credit.  I didn't used to do this, but I started to recently because I was linking to Amazon anyways (hello, we all shop there) and I figured you wouldn't mind if Amazon has to cut me some fabric or free books now and then.  Just FYI to keep things legit around here. Tally ho!

60 comments:

  1. Those are beautiful!! Such wonderful work, and I love the patterns! I'm very impressed, and enjoy your chipper attitude!! Have a great day!

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  2. So very pretty! A white house would be lovely wouldn't it? Till the kids came back in from wherever and it got all messed up again! I have gotta get me some AMH threads!!

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    1. Exactly. Those of you who can keep a house white have some serious dedication! We have mostly (brown) wooden surfaces, LOL.

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  3. I love, love these. Going to try it for sure!

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  4. These are so wonderful. I've always admired this style of work but been a little terrified to try it. Coasters are a great idea! And I love the threads! Need those.

    (and I say bonus points to you for the amazon awesomeness! I'm all for it, thanks for the links!)

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  5. wow, those are so super beautiful! i'm fully impressed!

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  6. I've always wanted to learn sashiko and now with your information and I can buy the CD with the course. I live in Chile. Thanks for sharing and your sashiko are really perfect. I liked the color of the fabric and color of the thread.
    Yasmin

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  7. I did some coasters (mug rugs, whatever) for Christmas presents. Some I bound with bias tape, and others I folded over the back. I really like your binding on these and would like to try that out. Do you have a tutorial for that or something?

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    1. Well, these aren't really bound. They are finished with a border and then sewn right-sides-together. Totally easy!

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    2. Thanks for that extra information Rachel. I will totally try to make these now. I've been hesitating on trying Sashiko for the very reasons you mentioned. Your suggestion is brilliant. And, your coasters are truly beautiful. Thanks for all of your tutorials, I love them!
      ~Diana

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  8. I love your work! And your yarn looks perfect for the coaster.

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  9. Beatiful Rachel! You always manage to think of a great simple projects with everything new that you try! Inspirational as always :)

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  10. Beautiful! Another thing I want to try now!

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    1. #84 on the list? It's a long list for me...

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  11. i picked up stitch magazine last week before you even blogged about it, and saw all your projects. out of everything in the magazine, i wanted to make these coasters the most! i love them!

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  12. Whoa, these are stunning! It's that elegant simplicity again...

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  13. Very pretty. I love the look of Sashiko.

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  14. Glad to hear you are feeling so great! I love both these projects! What a great idea to use coasters to try a new technique. Love the seed stitched purses too :)

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  15. Absolutely lovely. They would make great hot pads for the kitchen too!

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    1. Just don't let your family burn them! My first potholder was a English paper pieced hexagon work. And Brandon burnt it a few weeks after I finished. aaaaah!

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  16. I will have to look for the magazine! I have a sashiko project to pick up when I want to do some handwork. It is a kit that has the pattern printed for me on blue indigo and the thread is white. It's funny, I just pulled it out of my UFO pile last week. I really do like your choice of colors and fabric for the coasters.....great job : ) Thanks for the inspiration to finish what I have started so I can make your coasters.

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  17. These are really lovely, but I'm wondering what makes sashiko different from regular embroidery?

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    1. Hmm... I used to know the answer... It's something about how the spaces between the stitches is supposed to be very particular in relation to the length of the stitches. And, also the patterns are basically all-over line patterns that cover a surface. Well, I think you'd better follow that link to Studio Aika for the real answer. I'm sure I'm missing something!

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  18. So cool Rachel, the top one reminds me of my flowering snowball quilt! They look like iced cookies!

    Really interested in the kaufman lineny fabric.

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  19. So beautiful! I love the simplicity, the cool colors and textures and the stitching. Very nicely done.

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  20. Such a beautiful project, Rachel!! The soothing colors and your sashiko stitches pair so nicely together!

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  21. Wow!!! Those look fantastic. I absolutely love your coasters, what a great idea. And your stitches are so wonderfully uniform. so, so, so LOVELY!!!!

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  22. This just looks like so much fun and the results are swoon-worthy! Thanks for the introduction to the technique!! Goes right on my want to do list!

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  23. They are beautiful! I agree, they feel very tranquil and winter-y. I'll definitely give them a try, Rachel! And your Uncle Sam talk cracked me up. ;)

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  24. Added to my ever-growing pile of "things I want to make" ! Thanks for showing us!

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  25. Love your coasters- and the chipperness

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  26. i promise to only buy through your links to amazon from now on! i will gladly help you get more stuff for free! ;)

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  27. Oh I love this - the purse especially is adorable. I have the sashiko needles and some of the variagated thread so I`ll have to try this..although I will have to work out a way of transferring the design as I won`t be able to lay my hands on that paper here. Thanks for sharing and hope the Curves` class is going well!

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  28. I wanted to read your post all day because of the sashimi mention. I love sashimi embroidery, your examples are beautiful. Totally support your amazon deal! Why shouldn't you?

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. I think 'sashimi' is actually raw fish/sushi. The traditional Japanese embroidery craft is called 'Sashiko'. (I know, it sound similar, doesn't it? Too funny!) ;-)

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  29. Beautiful work, and such a nice idea making coasters. I really want to try some embroidery, really looks fun :)

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  30. I'm sorry but I had to laugh. If I do purchase anything from your links, I'll be sure to say howdy to Uncle Sam. LOL

    Anyway, those coasters are GORGEOUS! Wow.. Beautiful job you've done with those. I have some Sashiko Machine Embroidery designs but haven't tried any of those yet. They were just free samples given to those in her yahoo group to advertise her full set of them. They aren't small like this coaster size so I never gave it a thought when seeing them that they would make such gorgeous looking coasters. I think though doing them by hand may make them even prettier given the threads used by hand can sometimes be so much prettier.

    I really love the stitching against the linen you've used.

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  31. Beautiful coasters Rachel! Very wintery indeed :)

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  32. Impressed? Yes indeed! These are gorgeous!! I can imagine a quilt (a SMALL one) with every square a different stitch- like your coasters but attached... yeah right... next year?

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  33. Oooh, love the look of this stitching

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  34. Those Sashiko coasters are just beautiful!

    Hugs,
    Tatyana

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  35. I did hear some homegirls talking about Sashiko on public TV one day. It was fascinating. I love that you crafted this up with what was on hand :-) They look super cute.

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  36. OMG, your coasters are GORGEOUS!! You go girl!

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  37. Oh my goodness! I've never even hear of sashiko before, your stuff is STUNNING!! Absolutely gorgeous!! I'm totally inspired!

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  38. Those are beautiful! I will have to bookmark those to make. It is always nice to have a bit of handwork to do at various kids functions, soccer practice, dr. appointments etc. I think they are just about to pretty to use!

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  39. These are so cute! I really should get some of those great colors of pearl cotton.

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  40. I love these coasters! they would be such a fun way to try sashiko! good thinking. i love love perle cotton too... those trays of presencia at my lqs! love it. and your colors are just lovely as well.
    i wanted to do the amazon thing on my blog- but it claims i can't living in nc... so strange!

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  41. those are adorable! love them :)

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  42. How stunning & what gorgeous gifts they would make. Just lurve your colour choice!!!

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  43. Lovely coasters! Would like to make coasters too, but haven't found the time yet..

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  44. These look great, really pretty

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  45. So pretty! I pinned them and featured them on my blog yesterday (on Mondays I embed a bunch of pics from pinterest of random stuff that made me happy in the past week and your coasters fit the bill)

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  46. Congrats on another Stitch feature! Woo hoo for you! I love Sahiko . . . I have several books on it and have been dying to get more into it. I love it and I love your spin on it!

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  47. How did you work out how many stitches for each section of design? Did you guess? They're supposed to be even right?

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    1. Well, I wasn't interested in that level of accuracy =). I didn't plan the number of stitches. I just went for it!

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