Monday, August 15, 2011

Basted.

Basting is your favorite part of quilt-making, right?

90 degree quilt back

No? Well, I just can't imagine why not ;)

I used to dread basting before I switched to basting spray. Now, I know that basting spray is not for everyone, but I do want to pass on what's working for me for those of you who are interested.  I used to baste with a Dritz-brand spray available at my local Hancocks (and purchased with 40% off coupons!).  Except, they tended to be out all the time, which meant I had to resort to time-intensive, sharp little pins. 

A few months ago, I decided to look online for the best price on the Dritz brand.  It comes in a small can (6.5 oz), which was enough for 2-3 quilts, depending on the size.  No luck on that - this stuff is expensive everywhere!  I hesitated to try more affordable Sullivans or June Tailor sprays for two reasons:

1.  Some people report gummed up sewing machine needles and general angst when using basting spray.  I'd had nothing but smooth sailing with Dritz.

2.  Dritz is odor-free, which translates to less-toxic.  Fumes are not something I want in my home (because, really, I baste inside.  It's just practical).

So, after doing some research, I decided to plunk down the cash for this HUGE can of 505 basting spray.   Ever since I opened my ears, folks have been telling me that 505 is hot stuff.  But, expensive.  Well, at Sew for Less the 17 oz can retails for just $13.50!  That's almost 3 times as much product for just $4 more than what I was paying for the Dritz stuff on sale.  I bought myself 2 large cans for $35 including shipping.

And, I couldn't be happier!

I've finished a few quilts basted with 505 temporary adhesive spray, so I can confidently report that it works better than the Dritz.  How so?  It seems to hold on to the fabric better, so that I can get away with using even less spray.  It's totally odorless and doesn't even carry warning labels about using ventilation (but I still do open windows).  In fact it claims "Environmentally friendly - contains no fluorocarbons."  I realize that using basting pins is by far more eco-friendly, as they are reusable and don't come in an aerosel can.  And, I still use pins for small projects.  But, I make a lot of quilts and this is what I use for them.  Sometimes you make compromises.

basted with 505 spray

This baby quilt was basted on my living room floor in about 10 minutes, including time spent taping down the backing, while Liam played Jenga blocks on the table.  It was a busy, just about perfect Saturday morning.  I hope yours was as sweet!

31 comments:

  1. Yep. I'm with you on the basting spray. I've used 505 and I've used whatever's on sale at Joann Fabric with a 40% coupon. And I tape the backing fabric down on my basement tile floor. And I pin baste the whole shebang after spraying it. And never have wrinkles. I'm overly cautious I guess, but I hate wrinkles!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for the recommendation. I just recently started spray basting and it's so much easier! In fact, I basted one last night and it took me no time at all :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. I seriously love basting spray too. But I'm curious about how other people deal with overspray. I usually spray on my kitchen floor and then I have to scrub, scrub, scrub to get the residue off of the floor around the edges when I'm done. Am I just missing some obvious, but really smart tip? I mean, I still prefer it to pins, but the cleanup is a pain.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks for the recommendation! I just realized there is another option besides pins and have been wondering how well the sprays work! I have a quilt waiting to be basted but have been putting it off b/c of the pinning. I have 4 kids so anything that saves me lots of time is great! =)

    ReplyDelete
  5. I've been seeing lots of blogs recommending basting spray. I think I will order a can or two from that site so I can try it out, I didn't see any at my local craft store. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I love 505 and that is a great price for a big can. Might have to get it online this time. :) Makes basting SO much better, right? And anything that takes the chore out of that part of quilting is a good thing.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I've never tried spray-basting, but I appreciate the info. I'm a little hesitant to try it, but maybe it's time! Your new baby quilt is so cheery.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Questing on basting. I'm working on my first quilt and have read that the fabric may move or stretch when you are quilting. Does that not happen when you use basting spray instead of pins? I've been dreading when the time comes to have to pin a million pins in order to quilt.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Cassandra - I have no trouble with the fabric shifting when I baste with 505 (or the Dritz brand for that matter). I find the basting spray is more reliable for me than pins, but that's probably because I never put in enough pins!

    Stephanie - At first I used to put a scrap fabric/sheet around the quilt to catch the overspray. Now, I just don't worry about it because I can't feel it on our hardwood floors unless I'm really thinking about it. The area I spray is kind of out of the way. I figure it'll get cleaned next time I mop. I wonder if the kind of spray you are using is harder to clean off floors than what I've used?

    ReplyDelete
  10. I used to think of basting spray as "cheating", but I recently ended up in a super time-crunch and felt like I had no other feasible options. All of my local quilt shops were closed when this happened, so I just went for the June Taylor stuff at JoAnn's, and I've been totally converted to basting spray ever since! Besides the nasty fumes, I haven't had any problems with it at all.

    Also, I saw another comment asking how people deal with overspray. I just lay an old bed sheet on the floor first. I do all of my basting on a carpeted surface, and I've always found that the friction between the carpet and the sheet and the quilt is sufficient to keep everything flat without having to fuss with tape. Then I just throw the sheet in the wash when I'm done. (I should probably mention that I haven't done anything larger than a throw sized quilt this way, though, so I'm not sure how well it would work for something gigantic.)

    ReplyDelete
  11. I love 505. And I think I paid $25 for my last can, so go you!

    ReplyDelete
  12. I'm going to have to give this a try.

    And, I love the photo with the quilt and the jenga blocks.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I've always been hesitant to try the spray, but you guys are making a powerful argument! Just may have to try it! Thanks for all the info/tips.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I have been a huge fan of spray basting since I started quilting (and before I quit!).

    I've never had any troubles with it gumming up the needles or shifting or anything others complain about, but I'm a little nervous now. I'm going to spray baste the {Faith} circle quilts with minkee on the back...it's already slippery, so I'm tempted to spray baste and pin every now and then just to be doubly-sure it's not going to move.
    Wish me luck! :)

    ReplyDelete
  15. I was getting ready to say that you're completely mad, until I saw that you meant basting with spray! I always used to hate basting, to the point I'd avoid it for weeks, and eventually gave in and 'cheated' with basting spray. It's brilliant! I've only tried 505 spray, so can't speak for other types, but I've never had any gunking up of my machine or other problems. I've heard that it can discolour fabric if the quilt is left basted for weeks and weeks before quilting (and washing), but I've not left it that long, so can't comment on it.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I'm a convert as well and have only used 505. I do pin around the perimeter of the quilts just because I don't spray too close to the edges in order to avoid overspraying and the clean up!

    ReplyDelete
  17. totally agree with you! This is what I use and I can make a can last for a really really long time and it is just so awesome!

    ReplyDelete
  18. I love basting spray!! That's what I used as soon as I started quilting, and it works great. I tried pin-basting a baby quilt, and hated everything about it - putting in the pins, having to stop every 30 seconds while FMQing to take the pins out... I pinned the crap out of it and the fabric still shifted! Never again, spray is the way for me!! :)

    ReplyDelete
  19. I love basting spray too! I always use it on anything that doesn't go on my frame. I've always used the June Tailor spray - glad to hear the 505 is so good - I'll order some from that site, since it seems to be much better priced than what I'm buying at Joann's! Thanks for the tip!!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Thank you for your review of the 505 basting spray! Basting is my least favorite part of quilting, for sure!
    Great information. I am going to give this a try on an almost-done lap quilt when it is ready to baste.
    Thanks, again!

    LeAnn aka pasqueflower

    ReplyDelete
  21. I have used both June Tailor's and the 505 and like the latter better. As you said, using 505 seems to need less spray. I pin my small items but use spray and pins on the larger ones.
    I have found another site which also sells it cheaply: http://www.sewmanyparts.com/pages/Shop/category/4/

    I calculated that two cans there plus UPS shipping (to Florida, as an example) costs $32.81 - still less than at JoAnn's with the 40% off.

    What did we do before the web??

    ReplyDelete
  22. I love spray basting a quilt together - it's so much easier...although I've never tried that brand before, but I'll have to give it a try when I run out of the stuff I got at my LQS.

    ReplyDelete
  23. I have never used a pin and never plan to. Spray basting is the only way to go

    ReplyDelete
  24. Thanks for the online shop referral to get 505 at a cheaper price! I've been using it for years to baste my quilts, and just ran out...off to buy 2 cans!
    Tanesha (CraftyGardenMom blog and quilty podcast on iTunes)

    ReplyDelete
  25. I love basting spray.
    I use 505 too and I will never use pins again !

    ReplyDelete
  26. I just have to ask... when you spray baste inside, does it leave your floor/carpet sticky?!

    ReplyDelete
  27. Our wood floor gets just barely "off". Not even exactly "tacky".

    ReplyDelete
  28. I used it once for an on-point quilt that wouldn't lay flat and it did the trick. Not sure if it's true, but I've heard it's bad for your machine.

    I accidentally used some the other day thinking it was starch. Now there's a blog post waiting to happen.

    ReplyDelete
  29. I've been a huge fan of June Tailor's spray basting for a few years. I have no problems with it gumming up my needle, but I also don't start quilting until the basting is dry. I also spray my batting, not the fabric and smooth out the fabric very well. I get mine at Wal-Mart in the States (I'm in Canada), at a fraction of the cost of what Joanne's has it for. I'd love to try the 505 spray, but it is extremely expensive up here.

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts with Thumbnails